Instrumental Access 2016

University of Zambia: Department of Pharmacy

  • University of Zambia Department of Pharmacy faculty

    University of Zambia Department of Pharmacy faculty with Department Head Chichonyi Aubrey Kalungia (standing)

  • Third-year Department of Pharmacy students

    Third-year students working in a Department of Pharmacy lab

  • University of Zambia Department of Pharmacy lab block

    University of Zambia Department of Pharmacy lab block

  • University of Zambia Department of Pharmacy faculty

    University of Zambia Department of Pharmacy faculty

Meet the Department

The Department of Pharmacy at the University of Zambia School of Medicine is the primary training institution for pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists in Zambia. The Department of Pharmacy is based at the University Teaching Hospital and prides itself on education, research, and service to Zambia and the region. The University of Zambia is the oldest and largest of the country’s five public universities and is the only school offering both undergraduate and postgraduate training in pharmaceutical sciences.

 

Discovering Drugs to Decrease Disease Burden: Chichonyi Aubrey Kalungia

Aubrey Chichonyi KalungiaChichonyi Aubrey Kalungia is a lecturer and head of the Department of Pharmacy at the University of Zambia. He is leading a drug discovery study examining a novel antimicrobial compound that could provide an alternative treatment when a patient is resistant to conventional antimicrobial drugs–a growing concern with tuberculosis, for example.

Ongoing research at the Department of Pharmacy is evaluating the efficacy of Zambian traditional medicines for diseases like hypertension in hopes of documenting the uses of the country’s medicinal plants for the first time.

“Being a developing Department, it is high time we contributed to the development of Zambia’s pharmaceutical sector through innovative scientific research and consultancy to the industry, alongside producing quality trained pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists,” Kalungia says. “However, realization of this objective has been limited by the lack of essential requirements such as suitable scientific laboratory equipment requisite for effective training and research in pharmaceutical sciences.”

Kalungia holds Masters’ degrees in pharmacology and global health science from the University of Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and is currently pursuing a PhD in pharmacy education.