Instrumental Access 2021

Alupe University College

School of Science, Health Sciences and Education and Social Sciences

Designing more efficient solar panels in Kenya

  • Alupe University College science students teaching and making demonstrations to high school students visiting the university

    Alupe University College science students teaching and making demonstrations to high school students visiting the university

  • A laboratory in the School of Science, Health Sciences and Education, and Social Sciences

    A laboratory in the School of Science, Health Sciences and Education, and Social Sciences

  • Students involved in Community Based Education and Service on the management and prevention of jigger infestation

    Students involved in Community Based Education and Service on the management and prevention of jigger infestation

  • Additional lab space at Alupe University College, ready for Instrumental Access equipment

    Additional lab space at Alupe University College, ready for Instrumental Access equipment

Meet our Awardee

Alupe University College (AUC), a constituent college of Moi University, is focused on the sciences, including health, biological, and agricultural sciences.
 
The School of Science, Health Sciences and Education, and Social Sciences performs community-based trials for Malaria, HIV/AIDS, and pneumonia in addition to clinical trials focused on antimicrobial resistance. The school also hosts the only center in East Africa that focuses on leprosy treatments.

Research Areas

The department’s research interests include antimicrobial resistance, ecosystem health, energy, and noncommunicable diseases.

Teaching analytical and physical chemistry is very challenging. The areas require advanced equipment that we do not have, and simulation doesn’t develop the same skills as hands-on training. Equipment donated will have a big impact on skills transfer and research in the institution.”

—Denis Magero, PhD, Lecturer in Chemistry at Alupe University College

Storing solar energy with new metal complexes: Dr. Denis Magero

Denis Magero headshot

When Denis Magero, PhD (right), was a child, his family relied on solar panels to deliver power to their home in the evenings. Yet after an hour or two, the lights would go out, only returning after another day of storing energy in the batteries.
 
Though solar panels have come a long way since Dr. Magero’s childhood, he is determined to make them the most efficient deliverers of energy that they can be. As a lecturer in the Department of Chemistry at Alupe University College, his research is focused on making a tangible difference in the lives of those who, like him, are growing up with solar-powered homes.
 
Dr. Magero is a physical molecular chemist, and his current work focuses on a metal complexes called ruthenium polypyridine. This complex’s molecular photoproperties have proven more conducive to human use, and Dr. Magero sees potential in ruthenium polypyridine as important components in improving the efficiency of solar cells.
 
Some of the benefits of a better solar panel are obvious. The more energy generated and stored, the longer the lights can stay on. And a sustainable solution to delivering electricity to households is an advance in the movement towards green energy as a key area of research for the future.
 
Yet there is another, less obvious benefit to the project: Dr. Magero can share this research with his undergraduate students, inspiring these future scientists to tackle similar problems as they progress in their own careers. 
 
With Instrumental Access equipment, training students will be much easier, as they will have the right tools to carry out the research and to train students on the instruments that they will use throughout their scientific careers.
 
“I teach chemistry. The students are keen and inquisitive. But teaching analytical and physical chemistry is very challenging,” says Dr. Magero. “The areas require advanced equipment that we do not have, and simulation doesn’t develop the same skills as hands-on training. Equipment donated will have a big impact on skills transfer and research in the institution.”

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Alupe University College

As an international university, we need to produce graduates who have been trained hands-on in all of their programs. Our graduates serve a global society, and their skills will be felt and appreciated wherever they will work in the world.”

—Prof. Fabian Esamai, PhD, Principal and Professor of Pediatrics

About the Department

Location: Alupe, Kenya
Year Established: 2015
Students Impacted Annually:  600 undergraduate, 200 postgraduate

Why Instrumental Access?

Instrumental Access equipment will help the school stock new laboratory space and provide additional opportunities for students to train in practice rather than in theory.

Shipment Status

In transit to Kenya
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About Instrumental Access

Instrumental Access empowers scientists in developing countries. It gives them the resources they need to pursue life-changing research and teach the next generation.

To begin, we identify a pipeline of scientific talent. Then we rigorously screen universities and select those with the most potential to advance education and research through Instrumental Access.